History of Photography


 

 

 

 


 
Abbott Berenice
 

 

Model Lisette
 
Adams Ansel
 
Outerbridge   Paul
 
Brandt Bill
 
Rodchenko Alexander
 
Brassai
 
Sexton John
 
Bravo Manuel
 
Sherman Cindy
 
Callahan Harry
 
Skrebneski Victor
 
Doisneau
 
Smith Rodney
 
Kertesz Andre
 
Sommer Frederick
 
Koudelka Josef
 
Weegee
 
Laughlin Clarence
 
Weston Edward
 
Man Ray
 
White Minor
 
Mapplethorpe Robert
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Laughlin Clarence John

(b Lake Charles, LA, 14 Aug 1905; d New Orleans, LA, 2 Jan 1985).

American photographer. He spent his early childhood on a plantation in Louisiana before moving to New Orleans in 1910. A self-taught photographer, he began photographing in 1935, influenced by Baudelaire and French Symbolist poets. Initially imitating the objective photography of contemporaries Paul Strand and Edward Weston, he came to believe in the pursuit of his own visions and by 1939 considered his life’s work begun. Laughlin photographed what he came to describe as ‘the third world of photography’, concentrating on the remnants of the ‘Old South’; he produced images of crumbling plantations, graveyards and shadowy figures, visual parallels to novels by such writers as William Faulkner and Carson McCullers. He posed veiled women to represent spirits bearing the weight of history and often used double exposure and contrasts of light and shadow to invest inanimate objects with fearful possibilities, or to increase illusionistic possibilities—as in In the Cage (1940), an image of a child behind a louvre-door, the shadows cast on him like bars of a cage. A work such as Moss Monster (1946) demonstrates his ability to turn natural phenomena into a Surrealist image.

 



Laughlin Clarence John



             

1938


 

1938

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1940

1941

    


 

1941
    

1941
     




 
   

1941

1947

    


 
  

1954

 

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