Dictionary of Art and Artists



 

 


History of

Architecture and Sculpture

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

CONTENTS:

 
 

PART ONE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
PREHISTORIC ART
EGYPTIAN ART

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART
AEGEAN ART
GREEK ART
ETRUSCAN ART
ROMAN ART
EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

PART TWO
THE MIDDLE AGES
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART
ROMANESQUE ART
GOTHIC ART

PART THREE
THE RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE ROCOCO
LATE GOTHIC
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
THE RENAISSANCE IN THE NORTH
THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
THE BAROQUE IN FLANDERS AND HOLLAND
THE BAROQUE
THE ROCOCO

PART FOUR
THE MODERN WORLD
NEOCLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM
REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM, AND ART NOUVEAU

PART FIVE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY
TWENTIETH-CENTURY SCULPTURE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE


INDEX
FIGURES
 

 
 

 
 

CHAPTER SIX
 

THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
 

PAINTING
ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13,14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

 
 


ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE


Francesco Mochi.


(b Montevarchi, 29 July 1580; d Rome, 6 Feb 1654).

Italian sculptor. The son of Lorenzo Mochi, not of Orazio Mochi as was previously believed, he studied in Florence with Santi di Tito. Around 1600 he went to Rome to continue his training with the Venetian sculptor Camillo Mariani, whom he may have assisted on his masterpiece, the eight colossal statues of saints for S Bernardo alle Terme (e.g. St Catherine of Alexandria, c. 1600). At this time Mochi attracted the attention of Duke Mario Farnese (d 1619), who secured for him his first independent commission, the large marble Annunciation group for Orvieto Cathedral (c. 1603–9; Orvieto, Mus. Opera Duomo). Originally placed on opposite sides of the high altar, the two free-standing figures of the Virgin and the Angel Gabriel electrify the broad space between them by their complementary gestures and powerful emotions. The treatment of the Annunciation as an unfolding drama broke decisively with earlier sculptural traditions, which focused on self-contained, individual figures. Rudolf Wittkower has likened its vitality to a ‘fanfare raising sculpture from its sleep’. Often considered the first truly Baroque sculpture of the 17th century, Mochi’s innovations compare to those of the early Roman Baroque painters Caravaggio and Annibale Carracci.



Francesco Mochi. St Veronica
1629-32
Marble, height 500 cm
Basilica di San Pietro, Vatican




Francesco Mochi. Angel of Annunciation
1603-05
Marble, over life-size
Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Orvieto


Francesco Mochi. Virgin Annunciate
1608-09
Marble, over life-size
Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Orvieto


Francesco Mochi. Bust of Cardinal Antonio Barberini
1628-29
Marble, life-size
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio


Francesco Mochi. Equestrian Statue of Ranuccio Farnese (detail)
1612
Bronze, height: 30 cm
Piazza Cavalli, Piacenza


Francesco Mochi. Equestrian Statue of Alessandro Farnese
1620-25
Bronze
Piazza Cavalli, Piacenza


Francesco Mochi. Equestrian Statue of Alessandro Farnese
1620-25
Bronze
Piazza Cavalli, Piacenza


Francesco Mochi. St Martha
c. 1609-21
Marble, height 240 cm
Sant'Andrea della Valle, Rome


Francesco Mochi. The Baptism of Christ
1634
Marble, height: 315 cm
Palazzo Braschi, Rome

 
 

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