Dictionary of Art and Artists



 

 


History of

Architecture and Sculpture

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

CONTENTS:

 
 

PART ONE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
PREHISTORIC ART
EGYPTIAN ART

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART
AEGEAN ART
GREEK ART
ETRUSCAN ART
ROMAN ART
EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

PART TWO
THE MIDDLE AGES
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART
ROMANESQUE ART
GOTHIC ART

PART THREE
THE RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE ROCOCO
LATE GOTHIC
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
THE RENAISSANCE IN THE NORTH
THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
THE BAROQUE IN FLANDERS AND HOLLAND
THE BAROQUE
THE ROCOCO

PART FOUR
THE MODERN WORLD
NEOCLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM
REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM, AND ART NOUVEAU

PART FIVE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY
TWENTIETH-CENTURY SCULPTURE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE


INDEX
FIGURES
 

 
 

 
 

CHAPTER SIX
 

THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
 

PAINTING
ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13,14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

 
 


ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE
 


Filippo Juvarra.
 

Filippo Juvarra, Juvarra also spelled Juvara (born March 7, 1678, Messina, Sicily—died Jan. 31, 1736, Madrid, Spain), architect and stage designer who attained fame throughout Europe during the early part of the 18th century.

Juvarra studied in Rome (1703–14) under the architect Carlo Fontana and was commissioned to design scenes for Cardinal Ottoboni’s theatre in the Cancelleria Palace. He was also asked to do stage designs for the queen of Poland, Maria Casimira, in her theatre in the Zuccari Palace in Rome, and by the emperor Joseph I of Austria for the opera Giunio Bruto.

In 1714 Juvarra was appointed architect to the king of Sicily and moved to Turin, the Savoy capital. There he took charge of the third rebuilding and enlargement of the city of Turin. He also designed his two greatest masterpieces there, the royal hunting lodge at Stupinigi (begun 1729) and the Church of the Carmine in Turin (1732). Although his major works were in Italy, he also designed the palace at Mafra for John V of Portugal (1719–20).

In his early buildings in Turin, Juvarra favoured static, sharply defined spaces (San Filippo Neri, 1715; Superga, 1717; Madama Palace, 1718) designed in the traditional manner. Late in life his work was influenced by his stage design, and he learned to treat a building as a unified whole. His later work is noted for its concept of space—light and airy spaces producing a fluid, elegant effect. These late works rank among the finest examples of the early Rococo style in Italy.





Central part of the Royal Hunting Lodge of Stupinigi, Turin.




Façade of Palazzo Madama, Turin.




Basilica di Superga near Torino, Italy




Basilica di Superga near Torino, Italy




Cupola Della Basilica di Sant'Andrea, Mantova




Bell tower of the cathedral of Belluno designed by Filippo Juvara.




La Granja de San Ildefonso. Palacio Real.
Portada del Palacio Real de La Granja de San Ildefonso. Segovia, Espana




Royal Palace of Madrid.




East facade of the Royal Palace of Madrid. 1738–1764.
Architects Filippo Juvarra  and Giovan Battista Sachetti
 
 

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