Dictionary of Art and Artists



 

 


History of

Architecture and Sculpture

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

CONTENTS:

 
 

PART ONE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
PREHISTORIC ART
EGYPTIAN ART

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART
AEGEAN ART
GREEK ART
ETRUSCAN ART
ROMAN ART
EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

PART TWO
THE MIDDLE AGES
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART
ROMANESQUE ART
GOTHIC ART

PART THREE
THE RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE ROCOCO
LATE GOTHIC
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
THE RENAISSANCE IN THE NORTH
THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
THE BAROQUE IN FLANDERS AND HOLLAND
THE BAROQUE
THE ROCOCO

PART FOUR
THE MODERN WORLD
NEOCLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM
REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM, AND ART NOUVEAU

PART FIVE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY
TWENTIETH-CENTURY SCULPTURE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE


INDEX
FIGURES
 

 
 

 
 

CHAPTER THREE
 

POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM,

AND ART NOUVEAU


PAINTING

SCULPTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

ARCHITECTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

PHOTOGRAPHY

 


SCULPTURE

 

LEHMBRUCK.

Minne's art attracted little notice in France, but was admired in Germany. His influence is apparent in Standing Youth (fig.
1012) by
Wilhelm Lehmbruck (1881-1919). Here a Gothic elongation and angularity are combined with a fine balance derived from Maillol's art, as well as with some of Rodin's expressive energy. The total effect is a looming monumental figure well anchored in space, yet partaking of that poetic melancholy we observed in Picasso's Blue Period.
 


1012. Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Standing Youth. 1913. Cast stone, height 233.7 cm. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

 

 


Wilhelm Lehmbruck

Wilhelm Lehmbruck, (born January 4, 1881, Meiderich, near Duisburg, Germany—died March 25, 1919, Berlin), German sculptor, printmaker, and painter best known for his melancholy sculptures of elongated nudes.

Lehmbruck studied art in Düsseldorf, Germany, first at the School of Arts and Crafts (1895–1901) and then at the Art Academy (1901–07). His early work was academic and conservative; he was strongly influenced by the monumental works of the French sculptor Auguste Rodin, as seen in Lehmbruck’s The Bather (1905) and his life-sized Mankind (1909).

In 1910 Lehmbruck moved to Paris, where he executed not only sculptures but also a number of paintings, etchings, and lithographs. The rounded, simplified forms of his sculpture Standing Woman (1910) reveal his new enthusiasm for the calm Classicism of the French sculptor Aristide Maillol. In this sculpture, the idealized face is softly modeled and evokes a sensitive, introspective mood. Lehmbruck’s style became less naturalistic and more psychologically powerful with sculptures such as Kneeling Woman (1911). The harmonious repose of this figure’s angular, elongated limbs and her melancholy facial expression suggest a resigned pessimism, an attitude that characterizes Lehmbruck’s mature works.

At the outbreak of World War I Lehmbruck returned to Germany, where he worked in a hospital. His experiences with wounded and dying soldiers led him to create such poignant works as The Fallen (1915–16) and Seated Youth (1918), which indicate the artist’s state of utter depression. He committed suicide one year later. Although he was not involved in the German Expressionist movement, the emotionalism and elongated features of his sculptures have led critics and historians to associate Lehmbruck with Expressionism.

Encyclopædia Britannica
 

 

 


Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Bather





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Schlaf. 1907





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Tall Standing Woman.





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Weiblicher Torso. 1910





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Torso der Knienden. 1911





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Sinnende. 1913





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Sinnende. 1913-1914





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Der Gesturzte. 1915-16





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Der Gesturzte. 1915-16






Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Der Gesturzte. 1915-16





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Getroffener
1914




Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Torso





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Portratkopf Fritz von Unruh. 1918





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Head of a Youth.


 


Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Kneeling Woman. 1911





Wilhelm Lehmbruck. Kneeling Woman. 1911

 
 

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