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Eleanor Antin

 

 

Antin  Eleanor

(b New York, 27 Feb 1935).

American performance artist. In the mid-1950s she studied acting at the Tamara Daykarhanova School for Stage, New York, and creative writing at the College of the City of New York. Her performances can be seen as autobiographical, with invented roles based partly on historical characters. Set-pieces recurring in performances from the early 1970s included the King of Solana Beach, inspired by a portrait of Charles I, King of England, by Anthony van Dyck; Eleanor Antinova, giving the recollections of a black dancer in Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes; and the Angel of Mercy, Florence Nightingale in the Crimea. Antin considered her performances as a means of self-definition as an artist and woman in the late 20th century. The presentations incorporated pithy commentaries on contemporary social and political issues. The spontaneous nature of her activity can be linked to the early years of American film-making, when participants devised dramatic scenarios in an ad hoc sequence. By interspersing her personal experience and vision with episodes from the past, Antin attempted to redefine traditional boundaries associated with women, power and art. From 1979 she was Professor of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego.

 


Before the Revolution

 

 


The Tourists from "Helen's Odyssey
2007

 

 


The Banquet from The Last Days of Pompeii
2001

 

 


Going Home from Roman Allegories
2004

 

 


The Triumph of Pan (after Poussin)

 

 


100 Boots At The Bank

 

 


Carving: A Traditional Sculpture, 1972

 

 


Helen’s Odyssey

 

 


“delves into history - whether of ancient Rome, the Crimean War, the salons of nineteenth-century Europe,
or her own Jewish heritage and Yiddish culture - as a way to explore the present.”

 

 

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