Greek and Roman Myths in Art
 

 

 



Diana and Acteon

 

 

 


see also:

The Odyssey of Homer


illustrations by John Flaxman

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Greek and Roman Myths in Art

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see also EXPLORATION (in Russian):

Homer  "Iliad "and "Odyssey"

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Apuleius "The Golden Asse"

illustrations by Jean de Bosschere and Martin Van Maele

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Longus

"The Pastorals, or the Loves of Daphnis and Chloe"

illustrations by Marc Chagall

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Greek and Roman Myths in Art
 

 




Diana
 


Diana

(Encyclopaedia Britannica)

in Roman religion, goddess of wild animals and the hunt, identified with the Greek goddess Artemis. Her name is akin to the Latin words dium (“sky”) and dius (“daylight”). Like her Greek counterpart, she was also a goddess of domestic animals. As a fertility deity she was invoked by women to aid conception and delivery. Though perhaps originally an indigenous woodland goddess, Diana early became identified with Artemis. There was probably no original connection between Diana and the moon, but she later absorbed Artemis’ identification with both Selene (Luna) and Hecate, a chthonic (infernal) deity; hence the characterization triformis sometimes used in Latin literature.

The most famous place of worship for the Italian goddess was the grove of Diana Nemorensis (“Diana of the Wood”) on the shores of Lake Nemi at Aricia, near Rome. This was a shrine common to the cities of the Latin League. Associated with Diana at Aricia were Egeria, the spirit of a nearby stream who shared with Diana the guardianship of childbirth, and the hero Virbius (the Italian counterpart of Hippolytus), who was said to have been the first priest of Diana’s cult at Aricia. A unique and peculiar custom dictated that this priest be a runaway slave and that he slay his predecessor in combat.

At Rome the most important temple of Diana was on the Aventine. This temple housed the foundation charter of the Latin League and was said to date back to King Servius Tullius (6th century bc). In her cult there Diana was also considered the protector of the lower classes, especially slaves; the Ides (13th) of August, her festival at Rome and Aricia, was a holiday for slaves. Another important centre for the worship of Diana was at Ephesus, where the Temple of Artemis (or Diana) was one of the Seven Wonders of the World. In Roman art Diana usually appears as a huntress with bow and quiver, accompanied by a hound or deer.

 

 


Francois 
Boucher
1703-1770
France       
Diana Bathing.
1742

 


Francois 
Boucher
1703-1770
France
Diana's Return from the Hunt.
1745

 

Giambattista
Pittoni
1678-1767
Italy

  Dianna and the Nymphs.

 


Peter Paul Rubens
1577-1640
Belgium
Diana and her Nymphs Surprised by the Fauns.

 

Annibale
Carracci
1560-1609
Italy

Homage to Diana.
1597-1602

 

Peter
Paul
Rubens
1577-1640
Belgium
Diana Returning from Hunt.

 

Peter
Paul
Rubens
1577-1640
Belgium

 Diana and Callisto.

 

Domenichino
1581-1641
Italy

Diana the Huntress.
1614

 

Claude
Lorrain
1600-1682
France
Landscape with Cephalus and Procris Reunited by Diana.
1645

 

Arnold
Bocklin
1827-1901
Switzerland

Diana's hunt.
1896

 

Adriaen
de
Backer
1630-1684
France

Diana and Acteon.

 

Hendrick
von
Balen
1575-1632
Netherlands

Diana and Akteon.

 

Giuseppe
Cesari
1568-1640
Italy

Diana and Akteon.
1603
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest

 

Frans
Floris
1516-1570
Netherlands

Diane and Akteon.

 

Bartholomeus
Spranger
1546-1611
France

Diana and Acteon.

 

Titian
1488-1576
Italy

Diana and Acteon.

 

Titian
1488-1576
Italy

Diana and Callisto.

 

Francois
Clouet
1522-1572
France

The Bath of Diana.
1545
Museum of Art, São Paolo

 

Dosso
Dossi
1490-1542
Italy

Diana and Calisto.
1528
Galleria Borghese, Rome

 

Nicolas
Poussin
1594-1665
France
Landscape with Diana and Orion.

 

Boris
Vallejo
1964-
USA

  Diana and Acteon.

 

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